Lecture Series

Geographies of Wonder

Aug. 18, 25 & Sept. 1 (Thursdays) 10 a.m.–noon

Peter Blodgett, the H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western American Manuscripts, leads a three-part lecture series exploring major themes of the exhibition “Geographies of Wonder: Origin Stories of America’s National Parks, 1872–1933.” The series examines the roots of American fascination with scenic wonders, the evolution of the national park idea, and the creation of the National Park Service in 1916. Each session includes time spent in the exhibition discussing related materials. Members: $75. Non-Members: $90. Registration: huntington.org/calendar.

 

Botany Bay Series

Aug. 25 (Thursday) 4:30–5:30 p.m.

Join Jim Folsom, the Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington, for an informative and engaging exploration of the wonders of the plant world. A discussion-style lecture is followed by an opportunity for lab time with microscopes and plant specimens. Free; no reservations required. Botanical Auditorium, Brody Botanical Center. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

Southern California Gardener Series

Soil, the Soul of Our Gardens

Aug. 28 (Sunday) 2 p.m.

A thriving garden starts with healthy soil. Is yours in peak condition? Richard Hayden, head gardener at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, discusses how to build better soil, drawing on his own experience transforming a concrete parking lot into the NHM’s vibrant Nature Gardens. Topics include soil testing, soil structure and compaction, the importance of microorganisms, mulching, and composting methods and applications. General admission. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center.

 

Family Movie Night

Walt Disney’s The Jungle Book

Aug. 27 (Saturday) 7–9:30 p.m.

Join us for an outdoor screening of the 1967 animated classic The Jungle Book from Walt Disney Pictures. Bring a blanket and picnic to enjoy on the lawn. Pre-show activities and entertainment will add to the fun. Members: $15. Non-Members: $20. Ages 3 and under free. Tickets: huntington.org/calendar.

 

 

—SEPTEMBER—

 

The Huntington Ball

Sept. 10 (Saturday) 7 p.m.–midnight

Join us at our annual black-tie gala as we celebrate The Huntington’s first year under the leadership of its new president, Laura Skandera Trombley. Lynda and Blaine Fetter will chair this year’s event, which will begin with cocktails in front of the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery.  Dinner and dancing will take place under the stars on the adjacent Dorothy Collins Brown Garden lawn, which will be dramatically transformed for the night.  The gourmet three-course dinner will be catered by The Kitchen for Exploring Foods.  West Coast Music will make its Huntingtondebut. (Wear your dancing shoes!)  Floral design is by Jacob Maarse. Proceeds from the Ball support research and educational programming at The Huntington.  Tickets: $1,000. For details and sponsorship information, please call626-405-2264.

 

Harvest Moon Celebration

Sept. 27 (Tuesday) 6:30–9:30 p.m.

In China, celebrating the mid-autumn moon with family and friends is a centuries-old tradition. The Huntington will mark the occasion on Tuesday, Sept. 27, with a Harvest Moon Celebration held in the beautiful setting of its Chinese Garden, Liu Fang Yuan 流芳園 the Garden of Flowing Fragrance.  Guests will enjoy the sights, sounds, and flavors of a traditional Chinese celebration. Live music will be performed lakeside under the moon-lit sky by the Beijing-based Chinese Music Orchestra. Nearly 30 Chinese and Asian-inspired restaurants will offer tastings of fine wines, beer, and Asian cuisine (all included in the ticket price). And The Huntington’s fall exhibition, “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints” will be open in the Boone Gallery.  Guests who purchase a VIP ticket can enjoy early admission to the event at 5:30 p.m. Advance tickets required.  VIP: $148.  Members: $88.  Non-Members: $98.  Tickets: www.huntington.org/harvestmoon.  The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Event information: 626-405-2123.

 

The Isherwood-Bachardy Lecture

Becoming Gay in the 1960s: Reading “A Single Man”

Sept. 29 (Thursday) 7:30 p.m.

Novelist Edmund White discusses the lasting impression that Christopher Isherwood’s groundbreaking novel A Single Man had on him as a young author assembling his gay identity in the pre-Stonewall era. The program is the inaugural lecture in a new series made possible by the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. Artist Don Bachardy, who was Isherwood’s life partner, is the foundation’s president. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall. TheHuntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Information: 626-405-2100 or www.huntington.org

 

 

—OCTOBER—

 

Garden Talk and Book Signing

The Good Garden

Oct. 2 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander, author of The Good Garden, discusses how the design process for a residential landscape is informed by the interaction of natural site ecology, architectural ecology, and human ecology. A book signing follows the talk. General admission. Rothenberg Hall. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. www.huntington.org.

 

East Asian Garden Lecture Series

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?  Chinese Woodblock Prints of the Late Ming and Qing Periods

Oct. 3 (Monday) 7:30 p.m.

June Li, curator emerita of the Chinese Garden at The Huntington, will look at some of the functions of printed images in China from the late 16th through the 19th centuries, using examples from the exhibition “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints,” on view Sept. 17, 2016, through Jan. 9, 2017.  Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.  www.huntington.org.

 

Garden Talk & Sale

Chilean Plants

Oct. 13 (Thursday) 2:30 p.m.

Paul Mills, assistant curator of the collections at Ganna Walaska Lotusland in Santa Barbara, will discuss Chilean plants that are suitable for Southern California’s mediterranean climate. Among his top picks: Alstroemeria, Cantua,Sisyrinchium, Senicio, and Ranunculus. A plant sale follows the talk. Free; no reservations required. Ahmanson Room, Brody Botanical Center. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.www.huntington.org.

 

Conference

Early Modern Literary Geographies

Oct. 14–15 (Friday–Saturday) 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

Experts in the literature, history, geography, and archaeology of 16th- and 17th-century Britain will examine four key geographic sites: “body,” “house,” “neighborhood,” and “region.” By doing so, they will illuminate the important spatial structures and concepts that define the early modern engagement with the world. $25. Registration:www.huntington.org/calendar. Rothenberg Hall. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

Orchid Show and Sale

Oct. 21–23

Friday: Noon- 4:30 p.m.

Saturday & Sunday: 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Celebrate the amazing diversity of orchids—a vast family of more than 22,000 species in 880 genera—as hundreds of exotic blooms compete for top honors at The Huntington’s International Orchid Show and Sale. The event will showcase lush displays by local and regional orchid societies and international growers. Experts will give daily talks about orchid care and culture, and vendors will have a wide range of orchid plants and related merchandise for sale. General admission. Brody Botanical Center. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.www.huntington.org.

 

Drama After Dark: A Night of the Macabre with Poe and Gorey

Oct. 22 (Saturday) 6:30–10 p.m.

Thrill to the tales of Edgar Allan Poe and Edward Gorey in an evening of chilling drama presented by the actors of the Guild of St. George. Haunting works will be enacted throughout the moonlit grounds, including “The Pit and the Pendulum,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Gashlycrumb Tinies,” and more. Goosebumps guaranteed! Ages 10 to adult. (May be too intense for younger children.) Members: $45. Non-Members: $55. Registration: huntington.org/calendar.

 

From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: The Art and Science of Origami

Oct. 23 (Sunday) 2 p.m.

Recent decades have seen a revolution in the application of mathematical techniques to origami, the centuries-old Japanese art of paper folding. The algorithms and theorems of origami design have shed light on long-standing mathematical questions and solved practical engineering problems, leading, for example, to safer airbags and giant space telescopes. Robert Lang, one of the foremost origami artists in the world, will describe how geometric concepts also led to the solution of a broad class of origami folding problems, enabling artists to create designs of mind-blowing complexity. Free. No reservations required. Rothenberg Hall. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. www.huntington.org.

 

East Asian Garden Lecture Series

Painters, Carvers, and Style in Chinese Woodblock Printed Images

Oct. 25 (Tuesday) 7:30 p.m.

Suzanne Wright, associate professor of art history at the University of Tennessee, discusses the partnerships between Chinese painters and block carvers who worked together to produce woodblock prints of exquisite beauty and style in the Ming and Qing dynasties. The lecture is presented in conjunction with the exhibition “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock prints,” on view Sept. 17, 2016, through Jan. 9, 2017 at The Huntington. Free; no reservations required. Rothenberg Hall. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.www.huntington.org.

 

Botany Bay Series

Plant Science for Gardeners and Citizen Scientists

Oct. 27 (Thursday) 4:30–5:30 p.m.

Join Jim Folsom, the Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington, for an informative and engaging exploration of the wonders of the plant world. A discussion-style lecture is followed by an opportunity for lab time with microscopes and plant specimens. Free; no reservations required. Botanical Auditorium, Brody Botanical Center. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. www.huntington.org.

 

Fall Plant Sale

Oct. 28-30

Friday: noon to 4:30 p.m.

Saturday–Sunday: 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Fall is prime time for planting California natives, and home gardeners will find a wide selection of them at our annual fall sale, including salvia, ceanothus, buckwheat, toyon, and other dry-climate favorites. Expand your options with beautiful and water-wise Australian plants such as callistemon, grevillea, and westringia. And don’t miss the great selection of herbs, bulbs, grasses, shrubs, cacti, succulents, and more. General admission. Plant Sale Nursery. TheHuntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. www.huntington.org.

 

 

 

EXHIBITIONS

 

 

Yasuhiro Ishimoto: Bilingual Photography and the Architecture of Greene & Greene

June 18–Oct. 3, 2016

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing

 

Forty-six black-and-white photographs made by Japanese-American photographer Yasuhiro Ishimoto (1921–2012) of architecture by early 20th-century designers Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene are presented in this focused exhibition.

 

Van Gogh & Friends: Masterpieces of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the Hammer Museum

July 16, 2016–Jan. 2, 2017

Huntington Art Gallery

 

Fifteen important works from the Hammer Museum take up temporary residence at TheHuntington, offering visitors the unprecedented opportunity to enjoy masterpieces from both collections in one place.

 

Blast! Modernist Painting in Britain, 1900-1940

July 16–Nov. 14, 2016

Huntington Art Gallery, Second Floor, West Wing

 

Three recently acquired works of 20th-century British art are the centerpiece of a small focus exhibition titled, “Blast! Modernist Painting in Britain, 1900–1940,” on view through Nov. 14.

 

 

Geographies of Wonder, Part 1: Origin Stories of America’s National Parks, 1872-1933

May 14–Sep. 5, 2016

Library West Hall

 

The year 2016 marks the centennial of the National Park Service. To celebrate this anniversary, TheHuntington presents two consecutive exhibitions (the second will open October 2016) exploring the origins and evolution of the national park idea through rare materials selected from The Huntington’s American history archives.

 

Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints

Sept. 17, 2016–Jan. 9, 2017

Mary Lou & George Boone Gallery

 

This major international loan exhibition explores the art, craft, and cultural significance of Chinese woodblock prints made during their golden age, from the late 16th through the 19th century.

 

Geographies of Wonder, Part II: Evolution of the National Park Idea 1933–2016

Oct. 22, 2016–Feb. 13, 2017

Library West Hall

 

The Huntington Library continues to celebrate the centennial of the U.S. National Park Service in this second of two consecutive exhibitions that focus upon the critical role that national parks have played in American history.

 

 

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About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at huntington.org

 

Visitor information

The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, Calif., 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. It is open to the public Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from noon to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Sunday, and Monday holidays from10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Summer hours (Memorial Day through Labor Day) are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Tuesdays and major holidays. Information: 626-405-2100 or huntington.org

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