Did we learn anything from Hurricane Katrina? Do you remember when the photo by Associated Press photographer Dave Martin showed a black man holding a bad and some soda and he caption read “looting”? Then where was a white man in a photo by Chris Graythen from Getty Images that showed a white couple who were “finding” food? Graythen actually witnessed both white and black people were looting.

In this one, there’s at least two perpetrators that you can’t tell the race.

You’ve probably seen the video of Footlocker:

Let’s take this further. I wonder if this goes by that old Jim Crow-ish rule: One drop of black blood makes one black. How do we really know that even the black people are not part white?

That DNA issue aside, let’s consider the accusations being thrown around Hurricane Irma. What questions should be ask? Are the news teams patrolling predominately white neighborhoods? Are the predominately white neighborhoods better protected? Where the white residents better able to leave Florida before the hurricane touched down?

Then let’s look at the arrests. Jacksonville police arrested a suspected looter before Irma: Chaseton Massingale for armed burglary at a Seven-Eleven. Police were alerted by reports of people running out with items. Massingale had cigarettes.

In another earlier report, 30-year-old Keith Francis Adams of St. Lucie County was arrested on suspicion of burglarizing a building materials store.  Looking at Massingale and Adams, we could visually classify them as white.

New addition (13 Sept. 2017, 9:30 p.m. PST), there were two men and a light pole in Jacksonville. The two men, 46-year-old Victor Apeler and 42-year-old Blake Walle, were arrested for grand theft.

Looting is a crime. We know there are criminals–thieves, robbers, burglars, etc. of both races. Why would we think that looters would only be of one race? The answer is: No. Not all the looters during Hurricane Irma are black.

 

 

 

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